Ativan is a benzodiazepine prescribed to treat several anxiety and seizure disorders. It can also be used to treat anxiety-related insomnia and to calm patients before anesthesia and surgery. Ativan produces a calming effect on the brain and can produce a possibly addictive “high.”

Because of this, Ativan is meant to be used for only a short amount of time, typically between two to four weeks. Physical and emotional dependence can develop as a result of taking Ativan longer than prescribed, leading to Ativan addiction. Knowing the signs of Ativan addiction and treatment options can help you identify if you or a loved one has a problem with Ativan abuse and needs help.

When Is Treatment Necessary?

Ativan is prescribed for legitimate reasons, such as anxiety, seizure disorders and insomnia, but it can easily become a problem if not used as prescribed. When Ativan is used long-term, the likelihood of addiction and physical dependence increases. 

Ativan can also become more addictive if it is abused with other substances such as opioids. Ativan is among the top 100 prescribed medications in the United States and is widely used. Providers should be aware of any other medications someone is taking and any history of prior substance abuse before prescribing Ativan. 

Recognizing the signs of Ativan addiction can be the first step in helping you or a loved one seek treatment. Signs to be aware of include:

  • Unexpected loss or gain of weight
  • Skipping work, school or other obligations
  • Changes in sleep patterns
  • Taking more Ativan than is prescribed
  • Being unable to stop Ativan use, even if they want to
  • Experiencing withdrawal symptoms after stopping Ativan use

In the 2015–2016 National Survey on Drug Use and Health, research showed that 12.5%, or approximately 30 million adults, in the U.S. used benzodiazepines like Ativan and 17.1% misused them. Although that number may seem high, only 2% of those who abused benzodiazepines met the criteria for benzodiazepine use disorders. If you or a loved one think you are addicted to Ativan, treatment can help.

Ativan Addiction Treatment Programs

Depending on the length and severity of Ativan addiction, the level of treatment needed for recovery will vary. Patients typically start with a medical detox, where their body slowly rids itself of the Ativan in its system under medical supervision. Following detox, patients often enter inpatient or outpatient care, continuing through the levels of recovery as their health improves.

Inpatient Rehab

Inpatient rehab is a more intensive level of care where patients live onsite at the facility while receiving treatment. It is generally recommended for those with moderate to severe substance use disorders. Inpatient rehab can include:

  • 24/7 monitoring and support from medical staff
  • Psychiatric and medical health appointments
  • Group and individual therapy
  • Support groups
  • Family counseling
  • Recreational therapies
  • Medication management
  • Case management
  • Relapse prevention
Partial Hospitalization Program (PHP)

Partial hospitalization programs (PHPs) provide more self-direction and flexibility than inpatient treatment, but offer more supervision and monitoring than outpatient treatment. PHPs often include the same services and treatments as inpatient care, and act as a step between inpatient and outpatient offerings while still living at the facility.

Intensive Outpatient Program (IOP)

Intensive outpatient programs (IOPs) are the next step-down in rehab care. In intensive outpatient care, patients attend many hours of treatment each week while living at home or in a sober living community. They may receive many of the same treatments as higher levels of care, but they are accountable for their sobriety outside the facility. Individuals with mild to moderate addictions and supportive home environments are often better suited for IOP or traditional outpatient programs.

Outpatient Rehab

Outpatient rehab involves attending treatment at the facility while living at home. This level of care offers patients the most flexibility to continue working or maintaining their home or family, but also makes the patient entirely accountable for their recovery. Outpatient care offers many of the same treatments as higher levels of care, but for fewer hours per week. People who began in inpatient programs or PHPs often graduate to outpatient care after completing those treatment programs.

How Much Does Ativan Rehab Cost?

The price of Ativan rehab can vary depending on the level of care; for example, inpatient treatment involves living expenses like room & board, so it generally costs more than outpatient care. Other factors that can influence the cost of treatment are:

  • Location
  • Length of treatment
  • Co-occurring disorders
  • Amenities
  • Insurance coverage

Is Ativan Addiction Treatment Covered by Insurance?

Many insurance companies will cover some or all of Ativan addiction treatment costs. The Affordable Care Act requires many insurance plans in its marketplace to offer mental health care and addiction treatment coverage at the same standards as physical health care. Private health insurance plans through employers typically offer this as well. Admissions counselors at rehab facilities can help verify your insurance coverage and explain your benefits. You can also call your insurance provider to find out what coverage is available to you.

Addiction Treatment in Orlando, FL

If you are suffering from Ativan addiction and need treatment, Orlando Recovery Center is an accredited rehabilitation facility that uses evidence-based treatment approaches, healing amenities and compassionate, licensed staff  to treat Ativan addiction.

Orlando Recovery Center offers a full continuum of care, including:

Orlando Recovery Center is located near Downtown Orlando and has various amenities depending on the level of care:

  • Swimming pool
  • Fully equipped exercise gym
  • Basketball courts
  • Sand volleyball court
  • Yoga, art and life-skills therapy options
  • Lakefront views

Get Help Today

If you or a loved one is suffering from Ativan addiction, Orlando Recovery Center is here to help. Reach out to the helpful admissions team to learn about treatment, get your questions answered and start your journey to lifelong recovery.

Melissa-Carmona-1
Editor – Melissa Carmona
As the content manager at Advanced Recovery Systems, Melissa Carmona puts years of writing and editing experience to work helping people understand substance abuse, addiction and mental health disorders. Read more
Danielle-Boland
Medically Reviewed By – Danielle Boland, LCSW
Danielle is licensed clinical social worker, currently living and practicing in central Connecticut. Read more
Sources

National Alliance on Mental Illness. “Lorazepam (Ativan).” September 2021. Accessed April 15, 2022.

Longo, L. & Johnson, B. “Addiction: Part I. Benzodiazepines—Sid[…]sk and Alternatives.” American Family Physician, April 1, 2020. Accessed April 15, 2022.

Semel Institute for Neuroscience and Human Behavior. “Benzodiazepine Addiction.” 2022. Accessed April 15, 2022.

National Institute on Drug Abuse. “Benzodiazepines and Opioids.” February 3, 2021. Accessed April 15, 2022.

Medical Disclaimer

The Recovery Village aims to improve the quality of life for people struggling with a substance use or mental health disorder with fact-based content about the nature of behavioral health conditions, treatment options and their related outcomes. We publish material that is researched, cited, edited and reviewed by licensed medical professionals. The information we provide is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. It should not be used in place of the advice of your physician or other qualified healthcare provider.